Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Keywords

Multiple personality--Etiology; Multiple personality--Treatment;

Abstract

Dissociative Identity Disorder appears to be diagnosed more frequently in the current clinical arena. This may be connected to increased awareness of how people respond and cope with traumatic events, both singular and prolonged or serial. This increase in diagnoses may also correspond with new associations between childhood abuse and trauma, as well as research into how trauma is coded in memory.

Dissociation can be viewed as a natural phenomena that, when overly utilized as a defense against trauma and its impact, may develop in some persons into DID. Treatment of DID tends to progress through four phases: initial, middle, preintegreation, and integration-postintegration. However, these stages frequently do not follow in order and may need to be revisited as the therapist and client encounter new parts in the client's system. Accurate diagnosis, informed consent, and a strong therapeutic alliance that explicitly conveys trust and safety seem to be the most important elements in successful treatment of DID.

Year of Submission

1999

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Postsecondary Education

First Advisor

Terry T. Kottman

Comments

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Date Original

1999

Object Description

1 PDF file (41 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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