Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Abstract

In the secondary level, when most students are beyond the "learning to read" stage and are immersed in "reading to learn," the need for suitable materials and strategies for reading becomes quite important. One recognized and practiced method of guiding students through their reading is the use of a study guide. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tenth grade English students in an experimental group would have significantly higher quiz scores after having used study guides during a study of short stories. The following question was examined: Does the use of a study guide facilitate student comprehension of fictional materials? The subjects for this study were 64 tenth graders in four sections of "basic level" English. The experimental group contained 35; the control group contained 29. Over a period of two weeks, five short stories were assigned to both groups. The same pre reading procedure ~ was given to both groups. Those in the control group then read silently while those in the experimental group were given appropriate study guides to use during and after their silent readings. The following day, having finished reading, discussion, and guides, both groups were given a quiz. Two weeks after study guides had been used, another story was assigned to both groups, but no study guides were used. Their quiz scores were compared to see if the experimental group would show differences due to treatment. An analysis of the data showed no significant difference due to treatment. The use of the study guides does not facilitate comprehension of fictional materials. Additional, more carefully controlled research should be done on this topic so that classroom teachers might have a better understanding of study guides. Since study guides continue to be used, it would be helpful to know some strengths and limitations of this reading strategy.

Year of Submission

1981

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Education

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

Ned Ratekin

Comments

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Date Original

1981

Object Description

1 PDF file (43 leaves)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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