Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Keywords

Anger in children; Anger in adolescence; Cognitive therapy for children; Cognitive therapy for teenagers;

Abstract

This paper examines the need to address anger problems among children and adolescents given the implications of uncontrolled anger on relationships, education, possible involvement with the law, and physical and mental well-being. Aggression and its relationship to anger will also be discussed as well as the need to develop early intervention practices aimed at anger-related problems. A cognitive-behavioral approach will be presented as an alternative to many of the prevailing psychological approaches dominating individual and group interventions targeting angry and aggressive youth. A description of the key components of cognitive-behavioral anger management programs will be described, including arousal management, cognitive restructuring, skill acquisition, and practice and transfer. Four cognitive-behavioral anger management programs receiving considerable attention in the literature will also be discussed in light of strong, empirical research, including: In Control: A Skill-Building Program for Teaching Young Adolescents to Manage Anger, the Anger Coping Program, Think First, and Anger Control Training. While all four programs suggest promising findings, an argument is also made for the need to conduct quality outside evaluations which are scientifically sound and reflect tightly controlled, experimental studies. It is also recommended that an effort be made to target younger populations that have received little attention in the literature. Suggestions for adapting current programs to this age group are also presented. The paper concludes with a description of the unique role of a school psychologist in 111 identifying anger-related problems among children and adolescents and implementing anger management programs within their schools.

Year of Submission

2003

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Education

Department

n/a

First Advisor

Charlotte Haselhuhn

Second Advisor

Suzanne Freedman

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this graduate research paper and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

2003

Object Description

1 PDF file (49 leaves)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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