Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Abstract

This research study was conducted to learn what media selection tools and procedures a selected group of school library media specialists in Iowa used in selecting library media, and the amount of money these media specialists spent on different library materials during the 1983-84 school year. A questionnaire was sent to forty-six certificated library media specialists all of whom completed certification programs and/or masters degrees in the University of Northern Iowa Department of Library Science. Responses were received from forty persons.

Data showed 87.5 percent use SLJ, 82.5 percent use Booklist, and 85 percent use at least one general purpose bibliography such as those in the Wilson Standard Catalog series. There was less of a tendency to use special area bibliographies, with six of those bibliographies on the list reportedly not used by any of the responding group.

A total of 90 percent reported using tools purchased at the building level and 72.5 percent used tools borrowed or shared at the district and AEA levels

All but one respondent reported making purchase decisions on the basis of at least one favorable review, while 90 percent reported using a consideration file.

The results of this research study suggests that those school library media specialists trained in media selection and surveyed in this study have committed themselves to the use of recommended selection tools and procedures. However, the data did point to a lack of usage of those bibliographies that specialize in multicultural nonsexist materials. The data on library materials budget priorities revealed that books were given top budget priority and audiovisual materials were given a low budget priority. Purchase of computer software was not, at the time of the study, a very high priority.

Year of Submission

1984

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Department

Division of Library Studies

Comments

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Date Original

1984

Object Description

1 PDF (69 pages)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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