Complete Schedule

Presentation Type

Open Access Breakout Session

Abstract

This discussion-based workshop will engage faculty and students alike in identifying problem areas related to social responsibility and action. Using a “Wicked Problems” framework, the presenters will provide examples of and opportunities for participants to reflect on challenges they observe in their disciplines/professional lives and on their campuses. Wicked Problems are complex and multifaceted, do not have a simple description or solution, and “are different because traditional processes can’t resolve them” (Camillus, 2008). In a higher education context, faculty and students can address these problems but this will require “new ways of learning, new ways of working together, and new definitions and measures of progress and success” (Ramaley, 2014). Introducing the Wicked Problems framework in the classroom setting can encourage complex problem-solving that has implications far beyond academia, for both students and faculty. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to best approach systemic issues and take concrete action in collaboration with key allies.

Start Date

22-9-2017 9:40 AM

End Date

22-9-2017 10:30 AM

Event Host

Center for Academic Ethics, University of Northern Iowa

Department

Rod Library

Comments

Location: State College Room, Lower level Maucker Union, University of Northern Iowa

File Format

application/pdf

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Sep 22nd, 9:40 AM Sep 22nd, 10:30 AM

Addressing Wicked Problems in Practical Ways: Empowering Ethical Action in Higher Ed and Beyond

This discussion-based workshop will engage faculty and students alike in identifying problem areas related to social responsibility and action. Using a “Wicked Problems” framework, the presenters will provide examples of and opportunities for participants to reflect on challenges they observe in their disciplines/professional lives and on their campuses. Wicked Problems are complex and multifaceted, do not have a simple description or solution, and “are different because traditional processes can’t resolve them” (Camillus, 2008). In a higher education context, faculty and students can address these problems but this will require “new ways of learning, new ways of working together, and new definitions and measures of progress and success” (Ramaley, 2014). Introducing the Wicked Problems framework in the classroom setting can encourage complex problem-solving that has implications far beyond academia, for both students and faculty. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to best approach systemic issues and take concrete action in collaboration with key allies.