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Document Type

Research

Keywords

alien fungi, fungal plant pathogens, diseases caused by introduced fungi, white pine blister rust, elm wilt

Abstract

Species of the three groups of fungi characterized here on the basis of their energy source acquisition have differing potentials for becoming problem organisms following introduction as alien fungi new to Iowa. The decomposer group of fungi that obtain an energy supply by action of extracellular enzyme activity on dead plant tissues typically have perennial mycelium, are cosmopolitan in distribution, and are unlikely to become problems even if established. The second group, the mycorrhizal/lichen group are highly specific in their relationships. The mycorrhizal fungus group have a potential for being introduced as mycorrhiza already established with the roots of particular vascular plants. Their potential for survival and establishment would be linked with that of their vascular plant associate. The third large and diverse group of plant parasitic fungi holds great potential for becoming destructive problem fungi on susceptible native plant species. In Iowa, the development of the white pine blister rust fungus Cronartium ribicola Fischer on Pinus strobus L. and Ophiostoma ulmae (Buisman) Nannf. and Ophiostoma nrwo-ulmae Brasier on elms, particularly on Ulmus americana L., are classic examples of the destruction of native plant species by introduced fungi.

Publication Date

December 2001

Journal Title

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

108

Issue

4

First Page

112

Last Page

115

Copyright

© Copyright 2001 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf