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Document Type

Research

Keywords

insect disease, forest insects, forest invasives, introduced species, gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, pine shoot beetle, oak wilt and Dutch elm disease, garlic mustard, Lymantria dispar, Anoplophora glabripennis, Tomicus piniperda, Ceratocystis fagacearum, Certicystis ulmi, Alaria petiolata

Abstract

Iowa's forest resources of primarily deciduous trees covers over 0.8 million hectares (2 million acres) of upland and floodplain sites too steep or too wet for traditional row crop agriculture. These limited natural forests along with urban trees and shelterbelts plantings of trees are critical for environmental and economic enhancement in the state. Although not yet established in the state, exotic insects, such as gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, and pine shoot beetle, threaten native tree vitality. Established exotic diseases such as oak wilt and Dutch elm disease continue to plague the survival of Iowa's oak and elm resources, respectively. Perhaps the greatest threat to Iowa's forests is from exotic plants such as garlic mustard that replace native woody natural regeneration. Due to tight fiscal and staffing limitations, a cooperative effort through the Iowa Forest Insect and Disease Management Council works to focus monitoring, management, and research on exotic forest pests in the state.

Publication Date

December 2001

Journal Title

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

108

Issue

4

First Page

181

Last Page

184

Copyright

© Copyright 2001 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf