2018 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Abstract

Whole genome duplication (WGD) is a process in which the entire genome of an organism is duplicated, making redundant genes which are subject to unique evolutionary forces. Various modes of selection create different genetic fates such as retention of ancestral function, development of new function, or loss of function. Because of these differing fates, WGD is hypothesized to be a major driving force behind diversification. In this project, DNA sequences from fish species in the family Catostomidae were examined to observe patterns of evolution following a known WGD. Gene trees were generated for 179 loci to determine the amount of divergence among duplicates, revealing divergence to be more common than conservation. Time calibrated phylogenies were generated revealing the date of initial duplicate divergence within the subfamily Ictiobinae to be approximately 63 MYA. Further analysis could reveal the evolutionary fate of each loci, providing insight into the ways WGD affects diversification.

Start Date

3-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

3-4-2018 1:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Pete Berendzen

Department

Department of Biology

File Format

application/pdf

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Apr 3rd, 11:30 AM Apr 3rd, 1:30 PM

Rates and Patterns of Evolution in a Duplicated Genome in the Family Catostomidae

Whole genome duplication (WGD) is a process in which the entire genome of an organism is duplicated, making redundant genes which are subject to unique evolutionary forces. Various modes of selection create different genetic fates such as retention of ancestral function, development of new function, or loss of function. Because of these differing fates, WGD is hypothesized to be a major driving force behind diversification. In this project, DNA sequences from fish species in the family Catostomidae were examined to observe patterns of evolution following a known WGD. Gene trees were generated for 179 loci to determine the amount of divergence among duplicates, revealing divergence to be more common than conservation. Time calibrated phylogenies were generated revealing the date of initial duplicate divergence within the subfamily Ictiobinae to be approximately 63 MYA. Further analysis could reveal the evolutionary fate of each loci, providing insight into the ways WGD affects diversification.