Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

First Advisor

Tina Mawhorr

Abstract

The term "generation gap" is usually used to describe a situation in which a division develops between generations. The tension results from one generation, usually the younger generation, possessing a set of values and beliefs that are consistently different from the values and beliefs of another generation, usually the older generation. A comparison of newspaper articles concerning both Hippies and Generation Xers was conducted to illustrate the contention that generational conflict occurs in a cyclical pattern with each successive generation. The older generation usually portrays the younger generation in a negative manner. Articles from both The New York Times and The Des Moines Register from the years 1967-1969 and 1992-1994 were compared. The articles reflected contemporary portrayals of both Hippies and Generation Xers. A latent manifest content analysis resulted in the classification of derogatory portrayals. These categories include: alienated and antisocial; odd and immoral; lazy and apathetic; and childish and unintelligent. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Date of Award

1995

Department

Department of History

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1995

Object Description

1 PDF file (37 pages)

Date Digital

11-13-2017

Copyright

©1995 - Greg Becker

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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