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Document Type

Research

Abstract

In recent clinical psychology there has been an increasing tendency to link self-acceptance with the capacity to accept other individuals. Much of this movement has been led by Rogers (1949) and his students (Sheerer, 1949; Stock, 1949) using the phenomenological approach. It has been pointed out by Raimy (1948) that individuals who have been successfully counseled tend to shift markedly from a preponderance of self-disapproval to self- approval. Sheerer (1949) following this approach established that a substantial correlation exists between acceptance and respect for the self and acceptance and respect for others. Berger (1952) and Stock (1949) working within the same "non-directive" framework confirmed Sheerer's findings. Using a different orientation, Horney (1937) similarly concluded that those individuals who do not conceive of themselves as being an object of another's love are themselves unable to love others. Calvin and Holzman (1953) have demonstrated that the more poorly adjusted the individual, the more self-depreciative, relatively, he appears. Stock (1949) suggests that with increasingly better adjustment both self-acceptance and acceptance of others increases.

Publication Date

1954

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

61

Issue

1

First Page

446

Last Page

449

Copyright

© Copyright 1954 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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