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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Buried profiles of weathering have been recognized and utilized by many geologists in the determination and classification of Pleistocene deposits (1) * (2) (10) (20). In Iowa, Kay (5) used the term gumbotil for super drift clays. The gumbotil was found on tabular divides and other remnants of the Kansan drift plain, and was considered to be the result of weathering of glacial drift (8). Kay and Apfel (7) recognized gumbotil as a weathered product, but as something distinct from soil. For example, the Aftonian interglacial stage was stated by them as being represented in Iowa by "wide-spread Nebraskan gumbotil, peat, mucks, old soils, weathered sands and gravels." In Illinois, Leighton and MacClintock (9) also identified buried profiles of weathering in stratigraphic sections. Ruhe (12) recognized variations in texture of weathered tills in Shelby County, Iowa, which were a reflection of drainage conditions due to differences in topography.

Publication Date

1951

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

58

Issue

1

First Page

295

Last Page

306

Copyright

© Copyright 1951 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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