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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The term "biologist" may suggest a person who didn't quite succeed as a specialist, for biology after all is not a single science but a series of related sciences, whose relationships are not always obvious. The small liberal arts college biology professor and some of the naturalists have probably come closest to the category of "biologist," although neither· has been customarily designated specifically as a "biologist." In the past two decades a small number of private entomologists, usually known as "consulting entomologists," have appeared and managed in most cases not much more than barely to exist financially. Recently the term "consulting biologist" was suggested for their profession, as the consulting entomologist often deals not only with insects, but with other animals, and plants as well. These professional biologists are truly "biologists," as their existence often depends upon their ability to adjust themselves to all phases of biology, which is not a small achievement today considering the vast expansion of many of the biological fields in recent years.

Publication Date

1950

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

57

Issue

1

First Page

499

Last Page

503

Copyright

© Copyright 1950 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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