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Document Type

Research

Abstract

Probably no woody plant has been introduced as widely, in as great numbers, in as short a period of time as was the black locust, Robinia pseudoacacia L. in the middle 1930's. The desirable qualities of this species have been emphasized by a few enthusiastic advocates since the latter part of the seventeenth century. It was because of these early favorable reports, based chiefly on limited observations rather than on scientific investigations, that the black locust came to be regarded as a tree which would survive under the most unfavorable conditions and led to its selection in 1934 as a post tree for general planting in gullies for soil holding purposes, and on sites of every degree of erosion for soil building purposes. Subsequent failure, for no predictable reason, of the tree to become established and grow in numerous sites has resulted in the initiation of many experiments in an attempt to solve various phases of the problem of the ecological requirements of black locust. The conflicting results obtained have prevented any decisive conclusion as to the relation of site quality and cultural methods to establishment and growth of the species.

Publication Date

1949

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

59

Issue

1

First Page

95

Last Page

99

Copyright

© Copyright 1949 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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