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Document Type

Research

Abstract

In experiments dealing with wood rotting fungi, the best means of sterilizing the wood has long been a controversial question. In the majority of the work, the autoclave has been used for this purpose. This intense moist heat undoubtedly has an effect on the chemical composition of the wood, and therefore is not a satisfactory means of sterilization. Spauling (1906) states that at 100°C. 15-40 hours are necessary to effect any changes in the wood elements. Snell (1922) says that 12 hours at 105°C. (dry heat) is necessary to kill all of the mycelium in wood blocks % inch square (1.8 cm.). McGuire (1938) recommends dry heat for such sterilization and states that a minimum of four days at 90°- 95°C. is necessary to sterilize wood blocks of the size employed in his investigation (10 x 1 x 1 cm.). It is believed that sterilization at temperatures below 100°C. would have the least effect on the composition of the wood, and would therefore be the most satisfactory means of sterilization. This paper is the result of an attempt to confirm McGuire's experiment.

Publication Date

1947

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

54

Issue

1

First Page

63

Last Page

64

Copyright

© Copyright 1947 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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