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Document Type

Research

Abstract

The stinkhorn fungi have been chosen as the subject of the eighth group of illustrations of the fleshy fungi of Iowa. They are an interesting group because of their fetid odor that attracts flesh-eating flies, as well as their fantastic morphology. In the immature state their basidiocarps lie just below the surface of the soil, as globose to oval bodies composed of a thin leathery outer membrane over a gelatinous layer which in turn is bounded on the inside by a second membrane. The whole composes the volva which contains the unexpanded stem and spore mass. After a rain the stem expands, pushing the spore mass up into the air. The stem is spongy and hollow and expansion is rapid. The exposed spore mass which is sticky or slimy contains the greater part of the fetid material. Five species in five genera are illustrated and described.

Publication Date

1946

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

53

Issue

1

First Page

147

Last Page

151

Copyright

© Copyright 1946 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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