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Document Type

Research

Abstract

For a long time it has been known that the root-nodule bacteria of the Leguminosae differ considerably in their ability to inoculate plants. An outstanding example of this fact was brought to the attention of the early investigators when it was found that soybeans failed to produce nodules in European soils, while many other species of legumes were naturally inoculated. Kirchner (4), the first investigator to inoculate soybeans in Germany, found that it was necessary to use soil from Japan where the soybean was native and naturally inoculated. Since that time many such examples have been recorded. Just recently Gangulee (3), at the Rothamsted Experiment Station, England, has reported that the legume, Crotalaria juncea, was not naturally inoculated in British soils, and could not even be inoculated artificially until soil from India, where the plant is native, was used for that purpose.

Publication Date

1927

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

34

Issue

1

First Page

53

Last Page

57

Copyright

© Copyright 1927 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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