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Article Title

The Polyporaceae of Iowa

Document Type

Research

Abstract

The group of fungi belonging to the family Polyporaceae are principally wood inhabiting, a few species occurring on the soil. In making a survey of a woody area during either the spring, summer, or autumn, species of this group can always be found. These fungi grow either saprophytically on dead trees, both fallen and standing, or parasitically on living trees. Typical forms may be found on almost every stump, on prostrate logs and trees, on bridges, posts, and piers. Economically the family is of very little importance. A few of the species are edible, but since the American people do not relish them as food like the people of France, Germany, and other European countries, these fungi are of very little importance in the United States as a food. Sometimes certain species are aids to the farmer in that they assist in the rotting of old stumps in the field, but on the other hand they are far more detrimental in killing living trees in the native woods, apple trees in the farm orchard, and in the rotting of fence posts, and other wood material exposed to their attack.

Publication Date

1924

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

31

Issue

1

First Page

193

Last Page

204

Copyright

©1924 Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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