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Document Type

Research

Abstract

While laboratory animals have yielded very nicely to the study of their inheritance of color, the horse still remains a mystery in many of the phases of coat transmission. Hurst and Bunsow have recognized chestnut with the sorrel and liver shades as a true recessive, and Hurst has shown black to be epistatic to this reddish pigment. Bays and browns have been with difficulty separated but have been considered as epistatic to both colors mentioned, while grays and roans seem dominant to the entire series of color. One difficulty which seems to have beset all investigators up to the present time, with the exception of Dr. Walther, is the tendency to arrange all colors as an epistatic and hypostatic series, expecting them, then, to conform to the simple laws of presence and absence. That this attempt has been a real stumbling block the writer hopes to show, by means of his arrangement of factors in a manner slightly similar to Walther's and Sturtevant's methods but differing in the factors themselves.

Publication Date

1913

Journal Title

Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

20

Issue

1

First Page

316

Last Page

324

Copyright

© Copyright 1913 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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