Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Abstract

This research examines the reading interest in comic books of a Primary IV (term used in Ames, Iowa for Third Grade) and Intermediate III ( term used in Ames, Iowa for Sixth Grade) students. The study considered whether the sex, grade level, as well as reading ability of the students influenced the quantity and types of comics being read.

In the study three main hypotheses were tested. These hypotheses are listed as follows: 1) During a one week period, male students in the Primary IV and Intermediate III grades will read 25% more comic books than female students, 2) Students with a stanine score of 5 or below in the reading section of the Stanford Achievement Test will read twice as many comics as those with a higher stanine score of 6 or above on the same test, 3) Students in the Primary IV grade will read 25% more comic books than female students.

For the purpose of this study a questionnaire was used as the instru­ment to collect the data. A sample of 296 Primary IV and 315 Intermediate III students in six elementary schools were selected. The researcher received 199 Primary IV and 208 Intermediate Ill responses.

After all the questionnaires were completed by the students, the researcher consulted the files and recorded each student's stanine score in the reading section of the Stanford Achievement Test.

The findings of this study concluded that based on the data obtained that grade placement level, and sex are not important indicators of differ­ence in readers of comic books. However, the stanine score of the reading section of the Stanford Achievement Test appears to be a stronger indicator when compared with the sex and grade placement level of the students.

Year of Submission

1977

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Department

Division of Library Studies

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this graduate research paper and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1977

Object Description

1 PDF (iii, 36 pages)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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