Graduate Research Papers

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Open Access Graduate Research Paper

Keywords

Physical education and training -- Evaluation; Physical fitness -- Testing

Abstract

In January of 2001, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act. "The act redefines the federal role in K-12 education and will help close the achievement gap between disadvantaged and minority students and their peers. It is based on four basic principles: stronger accountability for results, increased flexibility and local control, expanded options for parents, and an emphasis on teaching methods that have been proven to work" (No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, 2003). The passing of the No Child Left Behind Act has added pressure to schools and departments around the country to meet these standards or loose funding. This pressure is permeated throughout the educational field and is intensified as physical educators look for more objective ways to evaluate their students. In the past, many physical educators have graded strictly on whether a student dresses out for class or by their mastery of athletic skills during a specific unit. With the No Child Left Behind Act passing into law, these grading methods will no longer be acceptable to the education community. Physical educators will be required to provide a higher level of accountability to their grading practices.

Year of Submission

2003

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Department

Division of Educational Technology

First Advisor

J. Ana Donaldson

Second Advisor

Sharon E. Smaldino

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit a request to scholarworks@uni.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL.

Date Original

2003

Object Description

1 PDF file (8 leaves)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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