Faculty Publications

Title

The impact of “girls on the run” on self-concept and fat attitudes

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology

Volume

3

Issue

2

First Page

127

Last Page

138

Abstract

The purpose of our quasi-experimental study was to examine the impact of the Girls on the Run (GOTR) program on multidimensional self-concept and attitudes toward fat. Young girls (N = 21) participated in a 12-week running program designed to increase their running ability, self-esteem, and, in general, their emotional, social, and mental well-being. It was hypothesized that girls would experience favorable changes in their global self-esteem, appearance, peer, physical, and running self-concepts and their attitudes toward fat. The overall RM-ANOVA examining for pre to post differences was significant, F(13, 8) = 26.46, p < .001, µ2 = .977, and follow-up within subjects contrasts revealed three significant differences: Physical, F(1, 20) = 6.24, p < .02, µ2 = .24, and running self-concept, F(1, 20) = 11.18, p < .003, µ2 = .36, as well as fear of fat, F(1, 20) = 4.37, p < .049, µ2 = .18, were all significant with meaningful effect sizes. These findings provided preliminary support for the major goal of the GOTR program, enhancing physical and running self-concept with some support for secondary gains in nonphysical ability areas (i.e., reductions in fear of fat).

Original Publication Date

6-1-2009

DOI of published version

10.1123/jcsp.3.2.127

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