Faculty Publications

Title

The effect of load reductions on repetition performance for commonly performed multijoint resistance exercises

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Back squat, Bench press, Fatigue, Free weight, Lat pull-down, Recovery, Repetition maximum, Rest interval

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Volume

26

Issue

11

First Page

2939

Last Page

2945

Abstract

The effect of load reductions on repetition performance for commonly performed multijoint resistance exercises. J Strength Cond Res 26(11): 2939-2945, 2012-The purpose of this study was to compare 4 different loading schemes for the free weight bench press, wide grip front lat pull-down, and free weight back squat to determine the extent of progressive load reductions necessary to maintain repetition performance. Thirty-Two recreationally trained women (age = 29.34 6 4.58 years, body mass = 59.61 6 4.72 kg, height = 162.06 6 4.04 cm) performed 4 resistance exercise sessions that involved 3 sets of the free weight bench press, wide grip front lat pull-down, and free weight back squat, performed in this exercise order during all 4 sessions. Each of the 4 sessions was conducted under different randomly ordered loading schemes, including (a) a constant 10 repetition maximum (RM) load for all 3 sets and for all 3 exercises, (b) a 5% reduction after the first and second sets for all the 3 exercises, (c) a 10% reduction after the first and second sets for all the 3 exercises, and (d) a 15% reduction after the first and second sets for all the 3 exercises. The results indicated that for the wide grip front lat pull-down and free weight back squat, a 10% load reduction was necessary after the first and second sets to accomplish 10 repetitions on all the 3 sets. For the free weight bench press, a load reduction between 10 and 15% was necessary; specifically, a 10% reduction was insufficient and a 15% reduction was excessive, as evidenced by significantly .10 repetitions on the second and third sets for this exercise (p # 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that a resistance training prescription that involves 1-minute rest intervals between multiple 10RM sets does require load reductions to maintain repetition performance. Practitioners might apply these results by considering an approximate 10% load reduction after the first and second sets for the exercises examined, when training women of similar characteristics as in this study. © 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Original Publication Date

11-1-2012

DOI of published version

10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182430170

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