Theses and Dissertations @ UNI

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Open Access Thesis

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between industrial first-line supervisors' participation in management training programs and subsequent job related performance as assessed by the subjects' overall management by objectives (MBO) performance appraisal rating .

Also, the relationship between managerial performance and predictor variables (age, years of supervisory experience, formal education level, self development, prior management training, and professional society involvement) was assessed.

Twenty-three first-line supervisors from a medium sized manufacturing organization participated in the study. A questionnaire was designed which extracted measures on the predictor variables from the subjects. Corporate management supplied the measure of the subjects' performance appraisal rating.

The research study was of an ex post facto design, with discriminant function analysis used as the test statistic to assess the research questions. Once the research questions were evaluated, a discriminant function was generated. The discriminant function supplied and equation which was 82.16% successful in predicting the performance on the research population.

The findings indicated:

  1. There was no significant relationship between the number of management training programs attended and managerial performance.
  2. There was no significant relationship between the number of management training programs completed and managerial performance.
  3. There was no significant relationship between the number of precious management training programs attended and managerial performance.
  4. There was no significant relationship between years of experience within the company and managerial performance.
  5. There was no significant relationship between years of managerial experience elsewhere and managerial performance.
  6. There was no significant relationship between formal education level and managerial performance.
  7. There was no significant relationship between age and managerial performance.
  8. There was no significant relationship between participation in continuing education and managerial performance.
  9. There was no significant relationship between participation in professional society activities and managerial performance.
  10. There was no significant relationship between reading professional journals/periodicals and managerial performance.

Year of Submission

1981

Department

Department of Industrial Technology

First Advisor

Michael White

Second Advisor

James LaRue

Date Original

1981

Object Description

1 PDF file (vi, 91 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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