Theses and Dissertations @ UNI

Availability

Open Access Thesis

Abstract

This thesis examines the effects of an alcoholic home environment, and suggests that growing up in such an environment may not provide the necessary base for the optimal development of self-concept. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine potential differences in self-concept among adult children of problem drinkers as measured by the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. This is facilitated through the use of The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST), and further evaluated in terms of sex of subject, birth order, and family size. The results indicate that adult children of problem drinkers tend to be more maladjusted and may have a greater propensity toward the development of personality problems and neuroses. Thus, it appears that being raised in a family disrupted by alcohol abuse may have a significant impact on an individual's emotional well-being during the adult years.

Year of Submission

1987

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Department of Psychology

First Advisor

John W. Somervill, Chairman, Thesis Committee

Date Original

5-1987

Object Description

1 PDF file (ix, 97 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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