Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Availability

Open Access Thesis

Abstract

Context: By the age of 24 years, diagnosable mental disorders begin to develop in one out of four Americans (Kaier et al., 2015). Young people also have deficits in knowledge about mental health literacy. This deficiency is one reason why individuals lack the ability to recognize mental illness and the appropriate measures needed to take to seek professional help (Kelly et al., 2007). This study investigates the mental health literacy and help-seeking attitudes of NCAA Division I student-athletes and non-athletes. Objective: Investigate the knowledge of mental health literacy and help-seeking attitudes of collegiate student-athletes and non-athletes. Design: Non-experimental, correlation and descriptive design. Participants: 444 participants (227 males, 212 females, 5 other) with a mean age of 20.07 (SD = 2.53). Methods: Participants were recruited during designated class times or team meetings. Participants completed a one-time survey consisting of a demographics form, Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS), and Attitudes Towards Seeking Professional Psychological Help-Short Form (ATSPPH-SF). Main Outcome Measures: Mental health literacy was measured by the MHLS. Attitudes towards help-seeking were measured by the ATSPPH-SF. Results: A MANOVA revealed significant differences by gender and mental health literacy (p < .0001). An ANOVA revealed significant differences by gender and help-seeking attitudes (p < .0001). A MANOVA revealed significant differences by gender and athletic status on mental health literacy (p < .0001). An ANOVA revealed significant differences gender and athletic status on help-seeking attitudes (p < .0001). A MANOVA revealed significant differences on previous mental health history and mental health literacy (p < .0001). An ANOVA revealed significant differences on previous mental health history and help-seeking attitudes (p < .0001). Conclusion: Student-athletes and non-athletes had above average levels of mental health literacy. The results of the study found significant differences on the MHLS and ATSPPH-SF based on gender, gender and athletic status, and previous mental health history. The results from this study can aid clinicians in the development of educational programs on mental illness for college students and student athletes as well as implementing more extensive questionnaires regarding mental health on pre-participation exams and throughout the rehabilitation process.

Year of Submission

2018

Department

School of Kinesiology, Allied Health, and Human Services

First Advisor

Peter Neibert

Date Original

7-2018

Object Description

1 PDF file (vi, 87 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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