Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Award Winner

Recipient of the 1998 Outstanding Master's Thesis Award - First Place.

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Availability

Open Access Thesis

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate whether the ingestion of ibuprofen prior to or after a 30-min bout of downhill (-10%) treadmill running would result in reduced sensation of soreness. A secondary purpose was to investigate whether ibuprofen would augment the diminished muscle performance following downhill running. Subject consisted of 21 males (age= 20.3 ± 1.7 years; weight= 77.4 ± 7.8 kg). Each subject was randomly assigned to either a control group, a prophylactic group which received 600 mg of ibuprofen 1 hour prior to the 30-min treadmill run and (200 mg every 3 hr postexercise up to 24 hours), or a therapeutic group which ingested 600 mg of ibuprofen at 24-hours postexercise and (200 mg every 3 hr till 48-hr postexercise). Multivariate ANOVA with a repeated measure revealed no significant difference in muscle soreness measures at preexercise, 0-hr, 24-hr, and 48-hr postexercise between the control, prophylactic, or therapeutic groups. Also, there were no differences between groups for vertical jump, fatigue index, maximal anaerobic power, or work capacity at any of the post-exercise testing times. Based on these results, the effectiveness of ibuprofen in regressing exercise-induced soreness or diminished muscle performance is doubtful.

Year of Submission

1996

Year of Award

1998 Award

Department

School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services

First Advisor

F. Kolkhorst

Comments

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Object Description

1 PDF file (vi, 74 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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