Richard O. Jacobson Endowed Chair for Research; Director, Center for Educational Transformation; Professor. Lisa Hooper: Dr. Hooper has served as an educator, scholar, researcher, mentor, supervisor, and leader for the past 18 years, since receiving her Ph.D. from George Washington University. Early in her career she served as an investigator, project director, and research instructor at Georgetown University School of Medicine, and later as a tenured professor at the University of Alabama and the University of Louisville directing research focused on the intersection between systems (e.g., school, family, neighborhood, community, health care) and race, ethnicity, and culture. She has had four major lines of psychology and education research: (a) the influence of family-of-origin factors (e.g., parentification, differentiation of self, attachment style) on the wellbeing and psychopathology of adolescents, adults, and families; (b) comorbidity research (i.e., influence of common medical conditions on mental health); (c) the link among family, teacher, and student factors on culturally responsive schools, cultural competence, leadership in school systems, and academic achievement; and (d) minority health and health disparities related to family systems-focused cultural competence, culturally-tailored care (e.g., diagnosis, measurement and assessment equivalence, treatment). Dr. Hooper’s research constitutes a collaborative, integrative, approach to ecological systems, psychology, education, and whole-person outcomes (e.g., academic, emotional, and physical). The idea of systems and whole-person care has applicability to individuals from cradle to grave, including K-20 populations, and transportability among diverse ecological systems, including schools. Dr. Hooper has been investigating the process and outcomes of parentification for the past 20 years. More information related to her work on the empirical study of parentification can be found at the following location: http://parentification-researchlab.com

The mission of the University of Northern Iowa's Center for Educational Transformation (CET) is to conduct and support basic research, translational research, and research to practice studies on the unique and combined effects of education, health, and culture. These studies improve and extend the knowledge and practice base on education, health, and culture for PK-20 populations and their families in Iowa and other national and global communities.

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