Biology Faculty Publications

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Invasion, biochar, plant-soil feedback, nitrogen, litter, immobilization

Journal/Book/Conference Title Title

Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition

Volume

16

Issue

4

First Page

941

Last Page

954

Abstract

Although carbon (C) additions to soil have been used in restoration to combat invasive species through changes in soil nitrogen (N) availability, carbon amendments to soil derived from plant material can impact soil N availability in a species-specific manner. As such, amendment-driven feedbacks on N may impact invasive species success and woody encroachment. Soil amendments like biochar, which is often added to soil to increase C storage in grassland systems, may unintentionally encourage woody encroachment into these grasslands by changing soil N dynamics. Few studies have examined biochar impacts on non-agricultural species, particularly invasive species. Woody encroachment of Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) into grasslands provides an ideal context for examining the impact of biochar in grasslands. In the greenhouse, we examined the effect of biochar or leaf litter derived from native and exotic grasses on J. virginiana seedling growth. Juniperus virginiana seedlings grew 40% bigger in biochar amended soil as compared to seedlings grown in litter amended soil. Additionally, we found a more than 2 order of magnitude increase in available NH4+ in the biochar treatments compared to the litter amended soils. Furthermore we found that biochar feedstock type did not have an impact on the effect of biochar, as both native and exotic grass biochar had similar impacts on soil N levels and J. virginiana growth. Our work suggests that once grassland litter is converted to biochar, species impacts on soil N may disappear. In conclusion, our data suggests soil amendments of biochar may encourage woody encroachment into grasslands.

Department

Department of Biology

Comments

First published in Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, (2016), by the Chilean Society of Soil Science. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0718-95162016005000067

Original Publication Date

2016

DOI of published version

10.4067/S0718-95162016005000067

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, University of Northern Iowa, Rod Library

Date Digital

2016

Copyright

©2016 Ramesh Laungani, Kenneth Elgersma, Kristin McElligott, Maria Juarez, and Tyler Kuhfahl. The copyright holder has granted permission for posting.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Biology Commons

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