2019 Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Title

Teacher Well-Being: Voices in the Field

Award Winner

Recipient of the 12th Annual Graduate Student Symposium Scholarship Award, Oral Presentations, State College Room - First Place (2019)

To go to the Graduate Student Symposium event page, Click here

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Teacher burnout and attrition have been the focus of numerous studies, including examination of organizational structures and factors contributing to burnout. Yet, teachers’ well-being through the voices and narratives of educators in the field remains an understudied area. This study explored the experiences of practicing elementary teachers as they navigated the demands of the teaching profession, and how these experiences contributed to their conceptualization of teacher well-being. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three elementary teachers. An exploration of their narratives revealed the powerful role relationships with school leaders and colleagues played and the impact of the emotional work in this profession. Implications for future research and practical applications are considered.

Start Date

3-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

3-4-2019 2:00 AM

Year of Award

2019 Award

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Sarah Vander Zanden

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

4-17-2019

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 3rd, 12:00 PM Apr 3rd, 2:00 AM

Teacher Well-Being: Voices in the Field

Teacher burnout and attrition have been the focus of numerous studies, including examination of organizational structures and factors contributing to burnout. Yet, teachers’ well-being through the voices and narratives of educators in the field remains an understudied area. This study explored the experiences of practicing elementary teachers as they navigated the demands of the teaching profession, and how these experiences contributed to their conceptualization of teacher well-being. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three elementary teachers. An exploration of their narratives revealed the powerful role relationships with school leaders and colleagues played and the impact of the emotional work in this profession. Implications for future research and practical applications are considered.