2019 Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Title

Unifying the English Major: Applying Process to Literary Studies

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Keywords

English literature--Study and teaching (Higher); Creative writing--Study and teaching (Higher);

Abstract

There is often a pronounced divide within English departments. One may find themselves in the area of writing studies, literature, or creative writing. Some sides resist mingling with one another as if they reside within separate majors altogether. I believe unity between these sides is not only possible, but beneficial. Writing studies and creative writing courses emphasize process. Writing courses designate classroom time for peer review, discussions, and editing, while literature courses often leave students to write on their own, opting for a discussion based approach. I believe that a process driven approach to literary studies would allow students to turn in sharper, more polished academic papers. By applying the concepts found in Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle’s Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies to a literature lesson over The Color Purple by Alice Walker, we can see how literature courses can borrow from writing studies. This would create a more unified English major.

Start Date

3-4-2019 1:00 AM

End Date

3-4-2019 4:00 AM

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Adrienne Lamberti

Department

Department of Languages and Literatures

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

4-30-2019

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 AM Apr 3rd, 4:00 AM

Unifying the English Major: Applying Process to Literary Studies

There is often a pronounced divide within English departments. One may find themselves in the area of writing studies, literature, or creative writing. Some sides resist mingling with one another as if they reside within separate majors altogether. I believe unity between these sides is not only possible, but beneficial. Writing studies and creative writing courses emphasize process. Writing courses designate classroom time for peer review, discussions, and editing, while literature courses often leave students to write on their own, opting for a discussion based approach. I believe that a process driven approach to literary studies would allow students to turn in sharper, more polished academic papers. By applying the concepts found in Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle’s Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies to a literature lesson over The Color Purple by Alice Walker, we can see how literature courses can borrow from writing studies. This would create a more unified English major.