2019 Annual Graduate Student Symposium

Title

Sex Differences in Adult ADHD Symptom

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

It has been established that the presentation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) differs by sex, with boys having higher rates of ADHD in childhood (Gaub & Carlson, 1997; Gershon, 2002). However, ADHD is less well-studied in adulthood, and a more nuanced understanding of sex differences in adulthood is warranted. As such, the current study examined group differences in current ADHD symptoms by sex and by prior diagnosis, as ADHD is neurodevelopmental and this would likely be predictive of future endorsement of symptoms. As part of a large, online multisite study, college undergraduates (n = 2,105) completed surveys of current ADHD symptoms. We examined differences by biological sex, as well as self-endorsement of prior diagnosis of ADHD. In a series of two (sex) by two (past ADHD diagnosis) ANOVA tests were conducted for current levels of inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and combined symptoms. Significant sex by past diagnosis interactions were found for inattention: F (2, 1875) = 15.33, p < .001; hyperactivity/impulsivity: (2, 1850) = 18.33, p < .001; and combined symptoms: (2, 1817) = 18.90, p < .001. These interactions suggest that women with a past diagnosis of ADHD report the highest levels of ADHD symptoms. The results indicate that women with a past diagnosis of ADHD experience higher levels of current ADHD symptoms than men, indicating the need for improved treatment of ADHD for college women. Further discussion and clinical implications will be included in our final poster.

Start Date

1-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2019 1:00 AM

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Elizabeth Lefler

Department

Department of Psychology

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

4-17-2019

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

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Apr 1st, 11:00 AM Apr 1st, 1:00 AM

Sex Differences in Adult ADHD Symptom

It has been established that the presentation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) differs by sex, with boys having higher rates of ADHD in childhood (Gaub & Carlson, 1997; Gershon, 2002). However, ADHD is less well-studied in adulthood, and a more nuanced understanding of sex differences in adulthood is warranted. As such, the current study examined group differences in current ADHD symptoms by sex and by prior diagnosis, as ADHD is neurodevelopmental and this would likely be predictive of future endorsement of symptoms. As part of a large, online multisite study, college undergraduates (n = 2,105) completed surveys of current ADHD symptoms. We examined differences by biological sex, as well as self-endorsement of prior diagnosis of ADHD. In a series of two (sex) by two (past ADHD diagnosis) ANOVA tests were conducted for current levels of inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and combined symptoms. Significant sex by past diagnosis interactions were found for inattention: F (2, 1875) = 15.33, p < .001; hyperactivity/impulsivity: (2, 1850) = 18.33, p < .001; and combined symptoms: (2, 1817) = 18.90, p < .001. These interactions suggest that women with a past diagnosis of ADHD report the highest levels of ADHD symptoms. The results indicate that women with a past diagnosis of ADHD experience higher levels of current ADHD symptoms than men, indicating the need for improved treatment of ADHD for college women. Further discussion and clinical implications will be included in our final poster.