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Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Post-traumatic stress disorder--Prevention; Pyschic trauma in children--Complications;

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) predicts the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among post 9/11 combat Veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Rationale: PTSD is a diagnosis found among a high percentage of combat Veterans who experience trauma while deployed. As research shows, trauma during childhood can affect and increase the trauma related to deployment and combat. This research paper expands upon the current literature that demonstrates a relationship between childhood trauma and trauma experienced among combat Veterans while deployed, as the results may benefit military branches in improving mental health services to service members. The researcher hypothesizes that combat Veterans’ ACE scores will be positively correlated with their PTSD scores. Method: A total of 51 Veterans were recruited via email at a mid-west liberal arts college. Participants were also recruited via the researcher’s Facebook friends, and from various Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFWs) organizations in Iowa. Veterans answered various demographic questions and completed two questionnaires: 1) the Adverse Childhood Experience questionnaire to obtain their overall ACE score; and 2) the PCL-M to obtain a total PTSD symptom severity score. Results: A Spearman’s Rho correlation was calculated, revealing a significant, moderately strong, positive relationship between a Veteran’s ACE score and their total PTSD symptom severity score. Conclusion: ACEs remains an important contributor to the development of PTSD among post 9/11 combat Veterans. These results justify a need for the Department of Defense to conduct ACE screenings before military recruits are deployed to combat zones.

Start Date

3-4-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

3-4-2018 1:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

William Downs

Department

Department of Social Work

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

4-25-2020

Available for download on Saturday, April 25, 2020

Included in

Social Work Commons

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Apr 3rd, 11:00 AM Apr 3rd, 1:30 PM

The Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Post 9/11 Combat Veterans

Objective: To determine whether Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) predicts the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among post 9/11 combat Veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Rationale: PTSD is a diagnosis found among a high percentage of combat Veterans who experience trauma while deployed. As research shows, trauma during childhood can affect and increase the trauma related to deployment and combat. This research paper expands upon the current literature that demonstrates a relationship between childhood trauma and trauma experienced among combat Veterans while deployed, as the results may benefit military branches in improving mental health services to service members. The researcher hypothesizes that combat Veterans’ ACE scores will be positively correlated with their PTSD scores. Method: A total of 51 Veterans were recruited via email at a mid-west liberal arts college. Participants were also recruited via the researcher’s Facebook friends, and from various Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFWs) organizations in Iowa. Veterans answered various demographic questions and completed two questionnaires: 1) the Adverse Childhood Experience questionnaire to obtain their overall ACE score; and 2) the PCL-M to obtain a total PTSD symptom severity score. Results: A Spearman’s Rho correlation was calculated, revealing a significant, moderately strong, positive relationship between a Veteran’s ACE score and their total PTSD symptom severity score. Conclusion: ACEs remains an important contributor to the development of PTSD among post 9/11 combat Veterans. These results justify a need for the Department of Defense to conduct ACE screenings before military recruits are deployed to combat zones.