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Title

Frankness in Gethsemane

Award Winner

Recipient of the 10th Annual Graduate Student Symposium Award, Creative Performances - Second Place (2017)

To go to the Graduate Student Symposium event page, Click here

Presentation Type

Creative Performance

Abstract

Even in the absurdity of their work, or abandonment of the typical convention, in their run-ons, Ginsberg and O’Hara communicate an ethereal holiness.

This poetry collection rhetorically addresses Ginsberg and O’Hara, adopting qualities of their work, while pushing in my own experience and voice. Strangely enough, I am drawn to the questioning inside O’Hara’s work over his stylistic abandonment of punctuation. There’s something honest and cutting in his interwoven questions, rendered imperative by periods, a dialogue that works back and forth between--Frank talking to himself. I take hold of Frank’s absurdist qualities, the strange thing he does with words, cramping in what I might describe as side jokes or an inclusion that puts the poem slightly off its rocker. This fight for form morphs into an invocation, almost a confessional poetry. In the construction of my own poetry, I suddenly find myself using ‘Frank’ repeatedly, calling out to him continuously in an attempt to get a feel for what he does. The fight for form becomes a fight for Frank. I open a strange dialogue between the pair of us.

The ultimate question I address within this body of the work: are we children of circumstance completely, bound to fight against whatever will is opposed? I deconstruct concepts of holiness and scatter religious questions amidst the milieu of a Midwestern childhood.

Start Date

4-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2017 2:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

Jeremy Schraffenberger

Department

Department of Languages and Literatures

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

Embargo Date

4-4-2017

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Apr 4th, 12:00 PM Apr 4th, 2:30 PM

Frankness in Gethsemane

Even in the absurdity of their work, or abandonment of the typical convention, in their run-ons, Ginsberg and O’Hara communicate an ethereal holiness.

This poetry collection rhetorically addresses Ginsberg and O’Hara, adopting qualities of their work, while pushing in my own experience and voice. Strangely enough, I am drawn to the questioning inside O’Hara’s work over his stylistic abandonment of punctuation. There’s something honest and cutting in his interwoven questions, rendered imperative by periods, a dialogue that works back and forth between--Frank talking to himself. I take hold of Frank’s absurdist qualities, the strange thing he does with words, cramping in what I might describe as side jokes or an inclusion that puts the poem slightly off its rocker. This fight for form morphs into an invocation, almost a confessional poetry. In the construction of my own poetry, I suddenly find myself using ‘Frank’ repeatedly, calling out to him continuously in an attempt to get a feel for what he does. The fight for form becomes a fight for Frank. I open a strange dialogue between the pair of us.

The ultimate question I address within this body of the work: are we children of circumstance completely, bound to fight against whatever will is opposed? I deconstruct concepts of holiness and scatter religious questions amidst the milieu of a Midwestern childhood.