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Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Research--Corrupt practices; Fraud in science; Universities and colleges--Faculty--Professional ethics;

Abstract

This poster shares selected results from a national survey, funded by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity, to investigate the perceptions of research misconduct by faculty researchers from four disciplinary areas (biology, social work, sociology, and psychology). About 4,500 faculty from 107 randomly selected research-intensive and master’s comprehensive universities were invited to participate, leading to a response rate of approximately 40%. Respondents assessed scenarios depicting researcher misbehavior and reported how likely they would be to take those actions under the same circumstances. They also rated their perceptions of how wrong the actions were, how likely the actions were to become known to others, and what sanctions might be applied if the actions were to become known. In addition, respondents reported their perceptions of organizational justice in their own research environments as well as external funding expectations and publication productivity.

Start Date

18-9-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

18-9-2015 10:15 AM

Event Host

Center for Academic Ethics, University of Northern Iowa

Department

Department of Psychology

Department

Center for Academic Ethics

Comments

Location - Mauker Union - Ballroom Lobby

File Format

application/pdf

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Sep 18th, 9:45 AM Sep 18th, 10:15 AM

Factors Contributing to Faculty Research Misconduct

This poster shares selected results from a national survey, funded by the U.S. Office of Research Integrity, to investigate the perceptions of research misconduct by faculty researchers from four disciplinary areas (biology, social work, sociology, and psychology). About 4,500 faculty from 107 randomly selected research-intensive and master’s comprehensive universities were invited to participate, leading to a response rate of approximately 40%. Respondents assessed scenarios depicting researcher misbehavior and reported how likely they would be to take those actions under the same circumstances. They also rated their perceptions of how wrong the actions were, how likely the actions were to become known to others, and what sanctions might be applied if the actions were to become known. In addition, respondents reported their perceptions of organizational justice in their own research environments as well as external funding expectations and publication productivity.