Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Award/Availability

Open Access Thesis

Keywords

Panicum--Iowa--Genetics; Coreopsis--Iowa--Genetics; Prairie conservation--Iowa; Genetic polymorphisms;

Abstract

The degree of genetic diversity within any species is crucial to its survival with respect to environmental stresses and its ability to adapt. As native Iowa prairie plant populations continues to diminish, genetic diversity within the state becomes crucially important for restoration, reconstruction, and conservation efforts. This study seeks to determine the degree of genetic variation within native Iowa populations of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) and Coreopsis palmata (prairie coreopsis, tickseed, prairie tickseed). Plants were obtained directly from the tallgrass prairie, from native seed plantings, and from greenhouse grown cultivated varieties (switchgrass). Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP) provided genetic fingerprints of each individual plant, which allowed for each species to be compared and analyzed. Genetic variation within switchgrass populations was found to be high, with most genetic variations occurring among populations. Genetic variation within prairie coreopsis was found to be average with most genetic variations occurring within populations. The genetic structures and characteristics shown in this study may provide insight for future prairie plantings and restoration efforts to maintain and increase genetic diversity within remnant prairie populations.

Date of Award

2002

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Department of Biology

Department

Tallgrass Prairie Center

First Advisor

James E. Jurgenson, Chair

Date Original

2002

Object Description

1 PDF file (xi, 122 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Botany Commons

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