Faculty Publications

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title Title

Iowa Council of Teachers of Mathematics Journal,

Volume

33

First Page

47

Last Page

53

Abstract

Many students think of measurement as a set of procedures, for example, lining up a ruler with an object, and stating the number on the ruler that corresponds with one end of the object. This may be one reason that measurement is typically one of the weakest areas of mathematical achievement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (Struchens, Martin, & Kenney, 2003). To combat students’ weaknesses in measurement, we suggest that in the early grades they need to develop a feel for standard measurement units, such as inches and feet, and become familiar with real world referents that correspond to those units in magnitude (Joram, 2003; Joram, Gabriele, Gelman & Subrhamanyam, 2005). Hope (1989) notes that developing knowledge of a wide variety of everyday referents for measurements (e.g., doorways are about 2 meters in height) is foundational to number sense in the arena of measurement, or measurement sense.

Department

Department of Educational Psychology and Foundations

Comments

First published in Iowa Council of Teachers of Mathematics Journal, v. 33 (2006), pp. 47-53, published by Iowa Council of Teachers of Mathematics

Original Publication Date

2006

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, University of Northern Iowa, Rod Library

Date Digital

2006

Copyright

© 2006 Iowa Council of Teachers of Mathematics. The copyright holder has granted permission for posting.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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