2022 Three Minute Thesis

Award Winner

Recipient of the 2022 Three Minute Thesis Competition Award - First Place & People's Choice.

Award selection process: The top two from each group in the first heat advanced to the final round and presented again. Winners were selected from those top four.

To go to the Graduate Student Award Recipients collection page, click here.

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Brain--Concussion--Diagnosis; Hemodynamics; Rugby football injuries--Diagnosis;

Abstract

Currently, concussions cannot be diagnosed by using imaging or laboratory tests. They can only be diagnosed by examining a patient and determining what their symptoms are compared to the symptoms that were or were not experienced before the patient was injured. If functional near-infrared spectroscopy can accurately detect the changes in brain hemodynamics after mild traumatic brain injury, it would allow athletic trainers and other health care professionals the ability to provide a more concrete diagnosis for the patient. This is significant as the frequency of sport-related concussions has been increasing, along with the possible long-term effects that are associated with mild traumatic brain injuries.

Start Date

11-11-2022 12:00 PM

End Date

11-11-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Graduate College, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Mark Hecimovich

Department

Department of Kinesiology

Comments

  • Heat 1, Group 2 - Rm. 301 ScholarSpace, Rod Library
  • Award Selection Process: The top two from each group in the first heat advanced to the final round to present again. Winners were selected from the Final round.
  • Graduate Program: Kinesiology

File Format

application/pdf

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Nov 11th, 12:00 PM Nov 11th, 1:30 PM

Changes in Brain Oxygenation of Rugby Players with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury During Match Play

Currently, concussions cannot be diagnosed by using imaging or laboratory tests. They can only be diagnosed by examining a patient and determining what their symptoms are compared to the symptoms that were or were not experienced before the patient was injured. If functional near-infrared spectroscopy can accurately detect the changes in brain hemodynamics after mild traumatic brain injury, it would allow athletic trainers and other health care professionals the ability to provide a more concrete diagnosis for the patient. This is significant as the frequency of sport-related concussions has been increasing, along with the possible long-term effects that are associated with mild traumatic brain injuries.