2022 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Document Type

poster

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify effective science teachers and analyze why they persist. This study was conducted using a mixed-methods approach including the Local Systemic Change Classroom Observation Protocol (LSC-COP) to generate a quantitative measure of science teaching effectiveness, along with using a phenomenological approach to investigate the experiences of effective science teachers who have stayed in the field. The median and mode of the LSC-COP capsule score were four and five respectively on a five-point scale indicating participants’ instruction was likely to enhance students’ understanding of science and their capacity to do science. Interviews with participants about their experiences yielded seven themes that pertain to effective science teachers' persistence: exemplary preservice/professional development programs, meaningful support, autonomy, student goals, engaging in deliberate practice, building relationships with students, and viewing teaching as a moral act. Our study found that for teachers to persist, they have to view teaching as more than a job and have the support and the freedom to engage in deliberate practice in order to continually improve.

Start Date

29-7-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

29-7-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Jesse Wilcox

Department

Department of Biology

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Sunday, January 29, 2023

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Jul 29th, 11:00 AM Jul 29th, 1:30 PM

Why do Effective Science Teachers Persist?: A Mixed Methods Approach Exploring Post-Induction Effective Science Teachers' Experiences

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

The purpose of this study was to identify effective science teachers and analyze why they persist. This study was conducted using a mixed-methods approach including the Local Systemic Change Classroom Observation Protocol (LSC-COP) to generate a quantitative measure of science teaching effectiveness, along with using a phenomenological approach to investigate the experiences of effective science teachers who have stayed in the field. The median and mode of the LSC-COP capsule score were four and five respectively on a five-point scale indicating participants’ instruction was likely to enhance students’ understanding of science and their capacity to do science. Interviews with participants about their experiences yielded seven themes that pertain to effective science teachers' persistence: exemplary preservice/professional development programs, meaningful support, autonomy, student goals, engaging in deliberate practice, building relationships with students, and viewing teaching as a moral act. Our study found that for teachers to persist, they have to view teaching as more than a job and have the support and the freedom to engage in deliberate practice in order to continually improve.