2022 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Document Type

poster

Abstract

In the recent years, the number of pollinators has decreased while the number of plants dependent on pollinators has increased. This is thought to be occurring due to multiple stress factors in pollinators. Placing pollinators in a good-forage habitat can help combat these stressors[1]. The Conservation Reserve Program provides farmers with annual payments to retire their land in hopes to help preserve important pollinator habitats[2] . Both native and non-native plant species can attract different types of pollinators and alter foraging patterns[3]. In this study, we look at two non-native species, Cirsium arvense and Taraxacum officinale along with two native species, Monarda fistulosa and Asclepias syriaca.

Start Date

29-7-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

29-7-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Ai Wen

Department

Department of Biology

File Format

application/pdf

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Jul 29th, 11:00 AM Jul 29th, 1:30 PM

Comparison of Plant Richness and Density in CRP-42 Fields Between 2018 and 2022

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

In the recent years, the number of pollinators has decreased while the number of plants dependent on pollinators has increased. This is thought to be occurring due to multiple stress factors in pollinators. Placing pollinators in a good-forage habitat can help combat these stressors[1]. The Conservation Reserve Program provides farmers with annual payments to retire their land in hopes to help preserve important pollinator habitats[2] . Both native and non-native plant species can attract different types of pollinators and alter foraging patterns[3]. In this study, we look at two non-native species, Cirsium arvense and Taraxacum officinale along with two native species, Monarda fistulosa and Asclepias syriaca.