2022 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Document Type

poster

Abstract

With many parameters by which water can be measured, it can be difficult to understand whether water is high quality or low quality. To solve this problem, many water quality indices have been developed over the last 60 years. The UNI Hydrology Lab uses the National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index (NSFWQI). This index provides a methodology by which Dissolved Oxygen, Fecal Coliform, pH, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Temperature Change, Total Phosphate, Nitrate, Turbidity, and Total Solids can be combined to provide a single number indicative of the overall water quality. In previous years, when WQI calculations were needed, the bulk of the work was done either by hand, aligning rulers on printed NSF graphs or one at a time with online calculators. This process is extremely time and labor intensive. This project sought to make a high-volume calculator with which thousands of data could be calculated in a matter of minutes.

Start Date

29-7-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

29-7-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Mohammad Iqbal

Department

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

File Format

application/pdf

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Jul 29th, 11:00 AM Jul 29th, 1:30 PM

Development of a Water Quality Index Calculation Tool using Excel

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

With many parameters by which water can be measured, it can be difficult to understand whether water is high quality or low quality. To solve this problem, many water quality indices have been developed over the last 60 years. The UNI Hydrology Lab uses the National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index (NSFWQI). This index provides a methodology by which Dissolved Oxygen, Fecal Coliform, pH, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Temperature Change, Total Phosphate, Nitrate, Turbidity, and Total Solids can be combined to provide a single number indicative of the overall water quality. In previous years, when WQI calculations were needed, the bulk of the work was done either by hand, aligning rulers on printed NSF graphs or one at a time with online calculators. This process is extremely time and labor intensive. This project sought to make a high-volume calculator with which thousands of data could be calculated in a matter of minutes.