2022 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Document Type

poster

Abstract

Bacteriophages (‘phages’) are viruses that parasitize (and often kill) specific bacteria, including the common soil inhabitants Bacillus cereus and B. anthracis. B. anthracis can cause anthrax, a deadly disease of cattle that has been used as a bio-terror weapon. Our lab examines phages with potential as therapeutics or protectants against B. anthracis, for which we use the ‘Safe’ vaccine strain, B. anthracis Sterne. Practical applications include ‘phage therapy’, where phages work against bacterial diseases. Phages suitable for any therapy or protection need to display physical stability under a wide variety of storage, transport and application conditions. Our previous student, Alexis Moore (‘AJM-2021’) successfully selected a group of B. cereus soil phages that with stood exposure to higher temperatures, filtration, aerosolization and exposure to ultraviolet light, blood & perspiration, and sunlight. We now continue that work by characterizing genome and structural proteins of selected & non-selected phages.

Start Date

29-7-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

29-7-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Michael H. Walter

Department

Department of Biology

Comments

The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Monday, July 29, 2024

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Jul 29th, 11:00 AM Jul 29th, 1:30 PM

Characterizing Selected, Durable Bacillus Cereus/Anthracis Bacteriophages

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Bacteriophages (‘phages’) are viruses that parasitize (and often kill) specific bacteria, including the common soil inhabitants Bacillus cereus and B. anthracis. B. anthracis can cause anthrax, a deadly disease of cattle that has been used as a bio-terror weapon. Our lab examines phages with potential as therapeutics or protectants against B. anthracis, for which we use the ‘Safe’ vaccine strain, B. anthracis Sterne. Practical applications include ‘phage therapy’, where phages work against bacterial diseases. Phages suitable for any therapy or protection need to display physical stability under a wide variety of storage, transport and application conditions. Our previous student, Alexis Moore (‘AJM-2021’) successfully selected a group of B. cereus soil phages that with stood exposure to higher temperatures, filtration, aerosolization and exposure to ultraviolet light, blood & perspiration, and sunlight. We now continue that work by characterizing genome and structural proteins of selected & non-selected phages.