2022 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Document Type

poster

Abstract

In 1926, Paul Nesbitt discovered around 350 shards of clay pottery in Seeberger cave, located 6 miles north of Maquoketa, Iowa. It is unknown if these artifacts were made in Iowa, or brought over from neighboring states. For this project, Dr. Heinzel, Faith Luce and I traveled to the area to collect samples of clay and stone. We got close to the cave, but didn’t have the equipment to cross the river at the time. The area we collected our samples from is about 600 meters away from the original site. The samples will be used to characterize the site, along with GIS and drone imaging. We plan on going back to the site to do more work and collect more samples. We are currently analyzing the chemical and physical properties of the collected samples to determine if the local resources match the pottery

Start Date

29-7-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

29-7-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Chad Heinzel

Department

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

File Format

application/pdf

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Jul 29th, 11:00 AM Jul 29th, 1:30 PM

Geoarchaeology of the 1926 Seeberger Excavation - Jackson County, Iowa

ScholarSpace, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

In 1926, Paul Nesbitt discovered around 350 shards of clay pottery in Seeberger cave, located 6 miles north of Maquoketa, Iowa. It is unknown if these artifacts were made in Iowa, or brought over from neighboring states. For this project, Dr. Heinzel, Faith Luce and I traveled to the area to collect samples of clay and stone. We got close to the cave, but didn’t have the equipment to cross the river at the time. The area we collected our samples from is about 600 meters away from the original site. The samples will be used to characterize the site, along with GIS and drone imaging. We plan on going back to the site to do more work and collect more samples. We are currently analyzing the chemical and physical properties of the collected samples to determine if the local resources match the pottery