2021 Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) Symposium

Location

Ballroom, Maucker Student Union, University of Northern Iowa

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Document Type

poster

Abstract

The binding of RAD51 protein to single-stranded DNA is important to the process of homologous recombination (HR). Although HR is a very important DNA repair pathway, there remain gaps in our understanding about the physical and structural properties of this mechanism. Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the binding process was visualized giving greater insight about the process of HR. Before imaging the DNA/protein complex, the DNA and protein were first imaged by themselves, and then combined to create the nucleoprotein complex to image. The collected images will help create a better understanding of the physical and structural properties of HR.

Start Date

30-7-2021 11:30 AM

End Date

30-7-2021 1:15 PM

Event Host

Summer Undergraduate Research Program, University of Northern Iowa

Faculty Advisor

Justin P. Peters

Department

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

File Format

application/pdf

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Jul 30th, 11:30 AM Jul 30th, 1:15 PM

Visualizing Human RAD51 Protein Binding to Single-Stranded DNA Using Atomic Force Microscopy

Ballroom, Maucker Student Union, University of Northern Iowa

The binding of RAD51 protein to single-stranded DNA is important to the process of homologous recombination (HR). Although HR is a very important DNA repair pathway, there remain gaps in our understanding about the physical and structural properties of this mechanism. Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the binding process was visualized giving greater insight about the process of HR. Before imaging the DNA/protein complex, the DNA and protein were first imaged by themselves, and then combined to create the nucleoprotein complex to image. The collected images will help create a better understanding of the physical and structural properties of HR.