2022 Research in the Capitol

Title

Graduate Student Knowledge and Skills in Infant Feeding Following High-Emotion Simulator Training

Location

Iowa State House, Rotunda

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (Electronic Copy Not Available)

Abstract

Graduate training in NICU feeding techniques is inconsistent and insufficient. UNI is the first speech-language pathology (SLP) program in the U.S. to utilize a novel technology known as ‘Paul,’ a computer-controlled and interactive infant simulator that mimics a premature infant through adjustable cries, breathing patterns, vitals, cyanosis, and abdominal distention. The present study explored differential gains in graduate students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills of NICU feeding techniques through a randomized control pilot comparing one-hour of classroom teaching (control) with one-hour of training with the infant simulator (experimental). SLP graduate students completed pre-/post-testing of both a written examination and an interactive feeding session with Paul to assess their knowledge and skills. After the conclusion of the study, the control group received the interactive simulator training. Technology-advanced infant simulation brings a unique contribution to training graduate students to care for medically-fragile infants without introducing risk to premature infants.

Start Date

21-2-2022 11:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2022 1:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Laura Pitts

Department

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

File Format

application/pdf

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 21st, 11:30 AM Feb 21st, 1:30 PM

Graduate Student Knowledge and Skills in Infant Feeding Following High-Emotion Simulator Training

Iowa State House, Rotunda

Graduate training in NICU feeding techniques is inconsistent and insufficient. UNI is the first speech-language pathology (SLP) program in the U.S. to utilize a novel technology known as ‘Paul,’ a computer-controlled and interactive infant simulator that mimics a premature infant through adjustable cries, breathing patterns, vitals, cyanosis, and abdominal distention. The present study explored differential gains in graduate students’ acquisition of knowledge and skills of NICU feeding techniques through a randomized control pilot comparing one-hour of classroom teaching (control) with one-hour of training with the infant simulator (experimental). SLP graduate students completed pre-/post-testing of both a written examination and an interactive feeding session with Paul to assess their knowledge and skills. After the conclusion of the study, the control group received the interactive simulator training. Technology-advanced infant simulation brings a unique contribution to training graduate students to care for medically-fragile infants without introducing risk to premature infants.