2020 Research in the Capitol

Title

Exploring the effectiveness of robotics curriculum on teaching STEM related concepts

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effectiveness of a robotics course in teaching about the surrounding STEM related concepts. The concepts that we focused on during the class were mathematics, physics, robotics, coding, and electronics. This study happened over the course of 5 weeks using pre-tests and post-tests. The tests consisted of 15 multiple-choice questions, 3 questions per concept area and ranged from simple rote memorization questions to minor problem solving. We found that low order concepts, such as simple memorization, were retained better than harder concepts, such as problem solving. Nearly all students had significant improvement in their ability to read the programming language provided as well as change existing code to take on a new task presented to them. A key factor in these findings may have been student interest in the class. Student interest varied greatly as this was a required course.

Start Date

24-3-2020 11:00 AM

End Date

24-3-2020 2:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Tim Kidd

Department

Department of Physics

File Format

application/pdf

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

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Mar 24th, 11:00 AM Mar 24th, 2:30 PM

Exploring the effectiveness of robotics curriculum on teaching STEM related concepts

The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effectiveness of a robotics course in teaching about the surrounding STEM related concepts. The concepts that we focused on during the class were mathematics, physics, robotics, coding, and electronics. This study happened over the course of 5 weeks using pre-tests and post-tests. The tests consisted of 15 multiple-choice questions, 3 questions per concept area and ranged from simple rote memorization questions to minor problem solving. We found that low order concepts, such as simple memorization, were retained better than harder concepts, such as problem solving. Nearly all students had significant improvement in their ability to read the programming language provided as well as change existing code to take on a new task presented to them. A key factor in these findings may have been student interest in the class. Student interest varied greatly as this was a required course.