2019 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Acting--Psychological aspects; Impersonation--Psychological aspects; Self-perception;

Abstract

The art of acting requires the authentic embodiment of another being; what happens in this process when a performance requires taking on a stigmatized sexuality? In summer 2018, an emerging theatre company in Cedar Falls, Iowa, produced Stop Kiss by Diana Son: a show that required its two female leads to embody same-sex sexuality. Guided by scholarship from Judith Butler, Jill Dolan, and Jerzy Grotowski — and following principles of practice-as-research — interviews and observation were used to explore and interpret how the actors in Stop Kiss experienced similarities and differences between their characters’ experiences and their own. Findings led to further questions about what positions an actor to be strongly affected by their work and the transformative power of publicly performing stigmatized sexualities in theatre spaces.

Start Date

1-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2019 2:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Amy Osatinski

Department

Department of Theatre

Department

Department of General Studies

File Format

application/pdf

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Apr 1st, 11:00 AM Apr 1st, 2:30 PM

She's Not Allowed to Do That: Two Actors Embody Female Same-Sex Sexuality

The art of acting requires the authentic embodiment of another being; what happens in this process when a performance requires taking on a stigmatized sexuality? In summer 2018, an emerging theatre company in Cedar Falls, Iowa, produced Stop Kiss by Diana Son: a show that required its two female leads to embody same-sex sexuality. Guided by scholarship from Judith Butler, Jill Dolan, and Jerzy Grotowski — and following principles of practice-as-research — interviews and observation were used to explore and interpret how the actors in Stop Kiss experienced similarities and differences between their characters’ experiences and their own. Findings led to further questions about what positions an actor to be strongly affected by their work and the transformative power of publicly performing stigmatized sexualities in theatre spaces.