2019 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Leishmania; Parasitic diseases--Sex factors; Immunologic diseases--Sex factors;

Abstract

Worldwide, 12 million people are infected with Leishmania spp. parasites. Leishmania are transmitted by the bite of sand flies. The parasite is internalized by immune cells where they develop, reproduce, and spread to new immune cells causing disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that males are more likely to develop disease. We recently demonstrated that Leishmania infantum survive better in immune cells of male origin than in cells derived from females. We also showed that L. infantum infection is characterized by fat accumulation. Additional experiments have shown that infected immune cells from males accumulate more fat than cells from females. We hypothesize that increased fat accumulation in immune cells of male-origin facilitate parasite survival and provide a basis for the increase male susceptibility in L. infantum infection.

Start Date

1-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2019 2:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Nilda E. Rodriguez

Department

Department of Biology

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Thursday, April 15, 2021

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Apr 1st, 11:00 AM Apr 1st, 2:30 PM

Induction of Lipid Bodies in Leishmania infantum-infected C57BL/6 macrophages of male versus female origin

Worldwide, 12 million people are infected with Leishmania spp. parasites. Leishmania are transmitted by the bite of sand flies. The parasite is internalized by immune cells where they develop, reproduce, and spread to new immune cells causing disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that males are more likely to develop disease. We recently demonstrated that Leishmania infantum survive better in immune cells of male origin than in cells derived from females. We also showed that L. infantum infection is characterized by fat accumulation. Additional experiments have shown that infected immune cells from males accumulate more fat than cells from females. We hypothesize that increased fat accumulation in immune cells of male-origin facilitate parasite survival and provide a basis for the increase male susceptibility in L. infantum infection.