2019 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Keywords

Self-determination, National; Climatic changes--Effect of human beings on; Climatic changes--Political aspects;

Abstract

Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) states that all people hold the right to have a nationality. How is this right to be fulfilled when a land submerges below the sea or becomes inhospitable for human life, thereby displacing the nation as a whole? In response to Christopher Heath Wellman’s defense of a legitimate state’s presumptive right to self-determination (2008), exemplified in its ability to limit immigration, I take up the question of what we as a democratic nation are obligated to do in the face of a mass migration of displaced persons due to the ramifications of climate change. Contrary to Wellman’s contention, I argue that a country is not a “country club” and that a radical modification of standards for admission is in order. At this juncture, a state’s right to self-determination cannot unilaterally determine who lives and who dies, especially in cases where it is a matter of having a piece of land to stand on.

Start Date

1-4-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

1-4-2019 2:30 AM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Yasemin Sari

Department

Department of Philosophy and World Religions

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Friday, November 01, 2019

Off-Campus Access

Share

COinS
 
Apr 1st, 11:00 AM Apr 1st, 2:30 AM

Democracy, Climate Change and Mass Migration: A Realist approach to environmental disruption and international displacement

Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) states that all people hold the right to have a nationality. How is this right to be fulfilled when a land submerges below the sea or becomes inhospitable for human life, thereby displacing the nation as a whole? In response to Christopher Heath Wellman’s defense of a legitimate state’s presumptive right to self-determination (2008), exemplified in its ability to limit immigration, I take up the question of what we as a democratic nation are obligated to do in the face of a mass migration of displaced persons due to the ramifications of climate change. Contrary to Wellman’s contention, I argue that a country is not a “country club” and that a radical modification of standards for admission is in order. At this juncture, a state’s right to self-determination cannot unilaterally determine who lives and who dies, especially in cases where it is a matter of having a piece of land to stand on.