2018 Research in the Capitol

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation (UNI Access Only)

Abstract

Gender discrimination has been a theme throughout human history that never seems to end. We see this within religious texts, in accounts of honour killings, and now we have the stories of the #metoo movement. To deal with this issue, people often take to their craft to express their feelings. From the original Greek classics to the complexity of modern-day musicals to the abstract feelings of performance art and music, different forms of art are used to communicate the motif of gender discrimination. Much Ado About Nothing is one of William Shakespeare’s statements about gender and the power of the slanderous word against women. This adaptation of the beloved comedy shows how the mindsets of yesterday influence the actions of today. Inspired by the works of Sophocles, Strindberg, Brecht, Riz Ahmed, Jerry Book, Sheldon Harnick, Joseph Stein, and others, this thesis is a study of how artists portray the theme of gender discrimination through their work.

Start Date

3-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

3-4-2018 1:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Programs, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Matthew Weedman

Department

Department of Theatre

File Format

application/pdf

Off-Campus Access

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Apr 3rd, 11:30 AM Apr 3rd, 1:30 PM

Much Ado About Gender: How Artists Express Feelings about Gender Discrimination through their Art

Gender discrimination has been a theme throughout human history that never seems to end. We see this within religious texts, in accounts of honour killings, and now we have the stories of the #metoo movement. To deal with this issue, people often take to their craft to express their feelings. From the original Greek classics to the complexity of modern-day musicals to the abstract feelings of performance art and music, different forms of art are used to communicate the motif of gender discrimination. Much Ado About Nothing is one of William Shakespeare’s statements about gender and the power of the slanderous word against women. This adaptation of the beloved comedy shows how the mindsets of yesterday influence the actions of today. Inspired by the works of Sophocles, Strindberg, Brecht, Riz Ahmed, Jerry Book, Sheldon Harnick, Joseph Stein, and others, this thesis is a study of how artists portray the theme of gender discrimination through their work.