Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Awards/Availabilty

Open Access Presidential Scholars Thesis

First Advisor

Thomas Lindsay

Abstract

The First Amendment guarantees that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech .... " The founding fathers clearly recognized the importance of freedom of speech to a democracy, and thus provided for its complete protection. A democracy, however, requires both liberty and order if it is to be effective. The problem, then, is balancing the needs of freedom and civil order in a manner that least restricts liberty, yet still maintains the order that is crucial to the life of a democracy.

The on-going debate over the scope of protection provided under the First Amendment reflects these conflicting needs of democracy. There are basically two schools of thought on the Freedom of Speech, and the views and arguments of the American Civil Liberties Union ACLU) and scholar Walter Berns, author of The First Amendment and The Future of American Democracy, provide an insightful and thorough representation of these two opposing schools.

Date of Award

1992

Department

Department of Political Science

Presidential Scholar Designation

A paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation Presidential Scholar

Comments

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this Presidential Scholars thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit an email request to scholarworks@uni.edu. Include your name and clearly identify the thesis by full title and author as shown on the work.

Date Original

1992

Object Description

1 PDF file (15 pages)

Date Digital

2-15-2018

Copyright

©1992 - Susan E. Hanna

Type

document

Language

EN

File Format

application_pdf

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